Anambra’s education worries

Ralph Anyacho identifies paucity of teaching staff for primary and high schools as two one of Anambra’s biggest education worries.

A number of issues are giving parents worries over the management of schools in Anambra state. Citizens of the state living outside of it who breeze in and fly out would think that all is well. But all is not well.

The Christmas/ new year mass home return is usually a time for stock taking. At one of the town hall meetings by my community two separate important guests interrupted proceedings.One was the principal of the community secondary school in the town. She came with tears practically dropping from her eyes, lamenting the lack of teaching staff. She appealed for support of the community to fix practically every thing, ranging from collapsing roofs, to no power supply, rickety school bus, stressing low morale among students resulting from lack of teachers in key subject areas. As she left the place in high hope trusting that her cries have not fallen on deaf ears, another guest this time came from the community primary school. Unlike the principal whom the roof is collapsing over her head, the primary school has one of the best structures anywhere in the state. Their big trouble is lack of teachers. There are only two teachers on government payroll. The rest of the teachers are being paid by the PTA of the school at N10,000 per month. And have come to the meeting to request for financial support to help the PTA defray the eight month salary arrears owed the teachers.

These two critical issues question the modus operandi of running schools in the state and the quality of education available especially in the rural areas. What is the partnership arrangement between the State and the Churches? Is any party reneging on the agreement? The above mentioned situation can not be tenable in a state competing for space among a comity of technologically driven states.

Something must be done and urgently too.

Anambra’s education worries